Courses Taught and Syllabi

ENGL1200: Writing II (3 credits)
Catalog Description: Expanding upon the argumentative and analytical emphases of Writing I, Writing II will foster research-based composition. In Writing II, students will demonstrate in prose their knowledge of rhetoric, employ a variety of research methods, and become familiar with latest information technologies.

Syllabus and Course Schedule

At the end of this course, successful students will be able to:
  • demonstrate in their writing a knowledge of rhetoric, uses of evidence, process-oriented writing, and academic community;
  • articulate importance of and employ a variety of research methods and genres;
  • obtain and evaluate reference materials, books, and articles, among any other sources needed;
  • use MLA or APA citation formats properly;
  • and develop insights effectively through written and oral communication.

ENGL2200: British Literature I (3 credits)
Catalog Description: This course surveys the major British literary texts from the Anglo-Saxon period through the seventeenth century. During this exploration, we study and discuss significant historical moments as well as cultural developments that defined the literary imagination of these time periods and influenced authors to create their writings.

Syllabus and Course Schedule

At the end of this course, successful students will be able to:
  • recognize and articulate the value of studying early British literature;
  • identify and analyze the textual, historical, and cultural contexts of works of literature;
  • read works of literature closely and thoroughly;
  • develop their insights effectively through written and oral communication, particularly via essay and collaborative wiki;
  • and identify the steps of the research process and apply information literacy skills in a variety of contexts.

ENGL2400: World Literature I (3 credits)
Catalog Description: This course presents a selection of works from around the world, from ancient/classical traditions up to the 16th century. We explore the aspects of the human experience and how they are reflected in the literary traditions of these time periods. Focus is on the Judeo-Christian and Greco-Roman foundations of Western literature, and on the Confucian, Hindu/Sanskrit, Buddhist, and Islamic underpinnings of literature in Asia and the Middle East.

Syllabus and Course Schedule

At the end of this course, successful students will be able to:
  • identify and analyze the textual, historical, and cultural contexts of works of literature;
  • read works of literature closely and thoroughly;
  • develop their insights effectively through written and oral communication, particularly via essay and collaborative wiki;
  • identify the steps of the research process and apply information literacy skills in a variety of contexts.

Special projects – successful students will be able to:
  • recognize and articulate the value of studying early world literature;
  • recognize and articulate the influence of early world literature in modern culture;
  • advocate for a position concerning the treatment of domestic violence and rape in university courses and/or the historical representations of domestic violence and rape in various cultures.

ENGL3030: The Middle Ages (3 credits)
Catalog Description: This course is an introduction to primary texts of medieval period, c. 500-1500, from both the British Isles and continental Europe, and explores the interconnected literary history of these traditions. Possible readings include the earliest extant Old English epic Beowulf, Chrétien de Troyes, Marie de France, Norse sagas, and Malory’s Morte d’Arthur. Genres covered may include epic, history, poetry, mysticism, hagiography, romance, and drama.

Syllabus and Course Schedule

At the end of this course, successful students will be able to:
  • recognize and articulate the characteristics and transmission history of a variety of literary traditions in different time periods and locations;
  • read works of literature closely and thoroughly;
  • demonstrate an understanding of the audiences and other historical contexts of literature;
  • engage with the detailed research process and apply information literacy skills effectively in a variety of contexts and analyze the value of scholarly sources and demonstrate this analysis through annotation, reflection, and its use as evidence in written and oral communication; and
  • develop and support insights effectively through written and oral communication, particularly via essay and public wiki.

ENGL4000: Major Authors - Chaucer (3 credits)
Catalog Description: This rotating course explores in depth the works and career of a major author who has made significant contributions to literary tradition. Students gain a unique understanding of literature by tracing out a variety of themes and genres within the author’s major and minor works. Through close attention to a single author students also learn first-hand how biographical, historical and literary contexts come to shape artistic output; the course also includes research and readings in literary criticism on the author.

Syllabus and Course Schedule

At the end of this course, successful students will be able to:
  • analyze effectively orally and in writing major themes in Chaucer's texts and the significant historical and cultural influences on these works;
  • apply sophisticated research skills, evaluate critical traditions in Chaucerian scholarship relevant to self-identified research questions, and formulate arguments effectively orally and in writing based on these evaluations;
  • create a digital portfolio of materials related to Chaucer and his works that could be used by others in the study or teaching of these texts and their contexts; and
  • recite Middle English aloud with confidence and compare its linguistic and grammatical characteristics to modern English.

Other Courses Taught (3 credits)
English 4400: Senior Seminar
English 3025: English Studies Abroad
English 2870: The Structure and Nature of Language
English 2620: Classic Mythology
English 2600: The Bible as Literature
English 2200: British Literature I; online
English 1100: Writing I

Graduate Courses
English 9019: Divine Power in Medieval Literature
English 9010: Chaucer
English 9007: The History of the Art of Memory
English 9002: Disease and Disability in Early Literature